FEMA employees pose as fake reporters during press conference

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Correction — September 10, 2013
 
The headline should not contain the word fake: the employees posed as reporters; they didn't pose as fake reporters, on the contrary they were fake reporters posing as real reporters. We aopologize for the error.
 

Friday, October 26, 2007

FEMA Deputy Administrator Harvey Johnson speaking about the California wildfires at the news briefing on Tuesday.

The United States Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is under fire after the agency held a fake press conference with fake news reporters in regards to individuals affected by the California wildfires and the assistance they could receive.

The agency called a press conference on Tuesday, giving the press only 15 minutes to show up. When many did not, FEMA brought in agency officials to pose as fake reporters and ask questions. The option for reporters to call into the conference was also available, but the ones who did call in only got to listen to the press conference, and could not ask questions. No reporters were actually present during the conference, parts of which were carried live on Fox News and MSNBC.

During the briefing, FEMA employees asked Deputy Administrator Harvey Johnson a series of what The New York Times called "decidedly friendly questions" such as "What type of commodities are you pledging to California?", "What lessons learned from Katrina have been applied?" and "Are you happy with FEMA's response so far?". The briefing followed the format of a press conference, with FEMA's press secretary at one point cautioning that he would allow just "two more questions", then calling later for a "last question". Officials who posed as fake reporters included the deputy director of public affairs Cindy Taylor and Director of External Affairs John "Pat" Philbin.

White House officials said that they do not condone FEMA's actions and also state that they had no idea that the conference was taking place.

"FEMA has issued an apology, saying that they had an error in judgment when they were attempting to get out a lot of information to reporters, who were asking for answers to a variety of questions in regard to the wildfires in California. It's not something I would have condoned. And they — I'm sure — will not do it again," said Dana Perino, the White House's press secretary in a statement.

FEMA apologizes for the mishap and says that their intentions were only to get the information to the citizens of California.

"[The purpose was] to get information out as soon as possible, and in trying to do so we made an error in judgment. Our intent was to provide useful information and be responsive to the many questions we have received. We can and must do better," said Harvey E. Johnson, the agency's vice administrator. "The real story -- how well the response and recovery elements are working in this disaster -- should not be lost because of how we tried to meet the needs of the media in distributing facts," a FEMA statement said.

FEMA is currently deciding whether or not any officials should face punishment for the incident. One of the officials responsible, Pat Philbin, is going on to be the new head of public relations for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

This is not the first time that the Bush administration has come under fire for planting reporters at press conferences. In February of 2005, White House reporter Jeff Gannon was accused of being planted to ask softball questions to President Bush. FEMA itself had earlier undergone criticism during Hurricane Katrina for using disaster workers for public relations in 2005.


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