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I don't know what you're smoking, but I hear St. John of Patmos was fond of strange mushrooms.

19:38, 11 April 2010

I suppose he was???

That would explain why the Bible is full of Fibonacci numbers first published in 1202 A.D.

It also contains Blaise Pascal's probability triangle containing Fibonacci numbers.

These were discoveries made in the middle ages and would require strange mushrooms for people to understand such an anachronism.

21:27, 11 April 2010

I suppose the prophet Daniel also smoked strange stuff when he predicted the exact date for the end of the millennium?

The Oslo Accord September 13 1993 + 2,300 days = December 31 1999.

Daniel 8:14 (New International Version)

He said to me, "It will take 2,300 evenings and mornings; then the sanctuary will be reconsecrated."

I have thousands of pieces of information supporting my case.

21:43, 11 April 2010

Take the example of the circle produced by the Hadron collider.

The area = pi*r^2

This is a quadratic equation.

The general form for a quadratic equation is ax^2+bx+c=0

If a=0, the equation becomes linear.

bx+c=0

If you take the straight line, you can put it in the center of a circle.

This is proven with the case of 3D anamorphic art.

I will not sway from my stance the Hadron collider is techno Babel.

The dunderheads are trying to connect the dots around the perimeter. The origin is in the center.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quadratic_equation

In this case, solving the roots does not allow for a=0 because of the term in the denominator. They are trying to solve (something)/0.

I wish to state again. this is techno Babel. They do not understand high school math.

21:59, 11 April 2010

I said this earlier, but it is worth repeating.

All they will find is a 90 degree angle.

High school math says the circle becomes linear at the origin.

The fact they built a Hadron collider tells me they do not know what they are doing.

01:21, 12 April 2010

Where did I leave the popcorn?

I'm sure you can do a great presentation of The Time Cube!™

Your brain is obviously composed of the more-common-than-hydrogen element; which is a joke I believe should be attributed to Harlan Eddison, or Frank Zappa.

04:39, 12 April 2010

*Sighs*

I would go as far as these comments are pretty much "meaningless technobabble." I mean, I don't get this "technobabble" and I am probably safely assuming our writers here don't either.

Brian, care to share some popcorn?

04:46, 12 April 2010

What flavour is the popcorn?

Joseph said the cup is in the corn.

15:10, 12 April 2010

The "popcorn" here is someone spouting off repeated bollocks about, say, the bible having special bits in it that relate to cutting-edge science. In reality, some whack-job like the loon who saw a face on Mars, has joined all these genuinely unrelated numbers to fit some spectacular bollocks that desperate people buy (Think those who believe there's some deep meaning in Dan Brown's dross).

The bible, if you go through it, never cites Pi to any real accuracy. It does give the various area formulae about circles, but the number where we'd put pi is stridently asserted to be 3. Even at the time those particular texts were put down on paper, fractions were known and used. If I recall the rule-of-thumb approximation correctly, it would be 22/7; which, if calculated and compared to what we know about the irrational number pi, is at least two orders of magnitude more accurate than 3.

On that basis alone, I would completely dismiss the entire book as devoid of any scientific content or credibility.

Fermat's Last Theorem was a research project worthy of scientists' time, even though it is only alluded to as a margin note in one of his books. Looking for Fibonacci numbers in the bible is like looking for the number 22 bus on the Moon; someone with Photoshop, or, in the numbers case, a plan to make a quick buck on an idiotic book, will come along and tell you not to trust people doing real science.

Really, the bible for deeper answers to scientific questions? Saying the LHC is a waste of money? Asserting that Special Relativity, General Relativity, and Quantum Theory are "trivially" reconciled?

Only a complete fucking moron with no concept of the process of scientific research, the stark difference between a hypothesis and a theory (Hint: The latter is only applied to something provable by substantial evidence and repeatable experimentation; the former, a slightly-wild idea that might form the basis for a new theory).

BeerDrinker has been hoodwinked, conned, and bought a line of crap from charlatans with glossy hardbacks asserting all science is wrong, we're regularly visited by aliens, and that sort of crapola. He's one of those desperately seeking some proof of a deity or an outside guiding hand in human evolution.

  • It is highly improbable (to a 0.00000000000000000000000001% sort of probability) there is a divine being who can intervene and interfere with the classical macro-scale physics interactions we've spent more than a hundred years looking at and playing with.
  • The "interesting" stuff goes on at the sub-atomic level.
  • Doing the "interesting" stuff is, based on our current understanding of the universe, very expensive, and a high-cost, high-energy issue.
  • The LHC is waved away as "creating the conditions that existed very shortly after the birth of the universe"; it isn't.
    • It is creating some of the ultra-short-lived particles suspected to have existed at that time.
    • Repeated creation of these particles, and observation of their decay into more normal/classical particles is a prime goal.
    • With a good dataset, various hypotheses can be compared with what we see now in the visible background radiation.
    • Just like evolution, we can look for other ways to get data to work out how a tiny, superhot, young universe became what we see now. That is:
      • Devising repeatable experiments to simulate conditions expected in the rapid expansion period.
      • Using more powerful telescopes, and new observational techniques, to collect more detailed information about the history of the universe, as told by light and other radiation now reaching Earth or satellites & probes within out solar system.

The hoped-for end result is not, as some assert, a "Theory of Everything"; it is for a hypothesis to be promoted to a theory which covers a broader range of the events and interactions we've repeatedly observed in the universe - fixing the "exception clauses" and "special cases" where General Relativity, Special Relativity, and Quantum Theory break down.

Such a long response may seem like BeerDrinker's bollocks, and assertion we have nothing more to learn. If he gives me a phone number I will try and arrange for Richard Dawkins to call and tell him to back away from the bible and seek psychiatric help.

00:42, 14 April 2010
Edited by author.
Last edit: 01:10, 14 April 2010

Hmm, this single overly long comment was worth more than a general skim over for its comedic purposes. Not a bunch of technobabble that I wouldn't even bother reading because One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (however one spells that Russian name) is much more interesting.

Oh, and the thing on pi.

"He made the Sea of cast metal, circular in shape, measuring ten cubits from rim to rim and five cubits high. It took a line of thirty cubits to measure around it. Below the rim, gourds encircled it - ten to a cubit. The gourds were cast in two rows in one piece with the Sea. The Sea stood on twelve bulls, three facing north, three facing west, three facing south and three facing east. The Sea rested on top of them, and their hindquarters were toward the center. It was a handbreadth in thickness, and its rim was like the rim of a cup, like a lily blossom. It held two thousand baths." -I Kings 7:23-26 NIV

00:52, 14 April 2010

As a side note, I think this is our first long argument type thread using LQT. I'd say the system worked rather well.

00:58, 14 April 2010

Yes it has.

01:03, 14 April 2010

Hi Brian, you write very well. I congratulate you.

The Book of Psalms chapter 119 in the King James version of the Bible has the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet separated by 7 lines 22 times. As you requested 22/7 = pi.

It also contains a Roman Mile. This is 1000 paces of 1.618 British yards. This is the Golden Number Phi=1.618... Note, they are British yards.

I find British numbers in other calendars too.

The Bible also says there will be signs in the sun moon and stars. The diameter of the moon=2160 British miles.

If we partition it as a dart board, there are 1335 points.

The book of Daniel says happy is he who lives 1335 days.

2160/1335=1.618

The Mayan calendar final Baktun cycle begins in the year 1618

Also Christ calls himself the Alpha and the Omega.

Alpha*Omega=1

This is the Barkhausen condition for oscillation.

i.e. frequency*time=1, or f=1/t

Let's change these symbols to x and y for calculating purposes.

He also presents an everlasting kingdom. i.e. x-y=1

If you solve x*y=1 and x-y=1, we get the Golden Number 1.618.

There is no other solution for perpetual motion.

The radius of the sun is 432,000 British miles. The Hindu calendar ends after 432,000 years.

In Norse mythology, Valhalla has 540 doors 800 men wide.

540 * 800 = 432,000

The Mayan calendar also contains pi=3.14

If we multiply pi=3.14 * 1000 =3140

Then take the diameter of the earth 7920 miles.

Using Kepler's problem of the earth in two places at the same time, we get 7920 *2 miles.

add these all up 3140 +7920 +7920 =18980

This is the length of the Mayan calendar.

02:35, 14 April 2010

BTW, the bible is veiled. There is more than one way to encrypt pi. Just because you don't see it, does not mean it is not there.

Genesis 14:14 When Abram heard that his relative had been taken captive, he called out the 318 trained men born in his household and went in pursuit as far as Dan.

1000/318=3.14

1.Nehemiah 11:6 The descendants of Perez who lived in Jerusalem totaled 468 able men.

468=355+113

355/113=3.1416

14:50, 14 April 2010

When you start looking for numbers that hard, you can find them in anything. I'll bet π is hidden in Harry Potter if you look hard enough

15:11, 14 April 2010

What you say is true 100%. You are correct.

I have spent over 10 years accumulating data. When the examples are few, as you say, they can be found anywhere. When they start piling up, then it is no longer random.

In my opinion, even a few hundred samples are not enough to convince me they are correct.

For example, The Golden number Phi=1.618 is found when you measure the wall of the al Aqsa mosque.

It is also found in the Parthenon, The great pyramid, Stonehenge, etc.

Solving this number is not simple using Roman Numerals for example, as it requires successive approximation.

Getting more than 1 or 2 decimal places of accuracy is not an easy task.

21:12, 14 April 2010

Uhh, could you use more than one sentence per line? It's really spaced out. Paragraph form is a good thing.

22:35, 14 April 2010
 

>I have spent over 10 years accumulating data. When the examples are few, as you say, they can be >found anywhere. When they start piling up, then it is no longer random.

>In my opinion, even a few hundred samples are not enough to convince me they are correct.

Even cooler is the fact that for every single circle, if measure how long it is around the edge, and then divide that by it diameter, you get the same number every time: π!

Clearly something requiring divine explanation is at hand. Like really what is the chances that will happen EVERY SINGLE TIME !

00:07, 15 April 2010
 
 

Sir, Have you been drinking tonight?

23:33, 15 April 2010