2006 "Stolenwealth" Games to confront Commonwealth Games in Melbourne

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Friday, March 3, 2006

The possibility of large-scale protests in the face of the 3,000 journalists covering the Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games, has event organisers and the Government worried.

The group "Black GST" - which represents Indigenous Genocide, Sovereignty and Treaty - are planning demonstrations at prominent Games events unless the Government agrees to a range of demands including an end to Aboriginal genocide, Aboriginal Sovereignty and the signing of a treaty.

The Black GST say they hope the focus of the world's media will draw attention to the plight of indigenous Australians during the Games. Organisers say supporters are converging from across Australia and from overseas. Organisers say up to 20,000 people may take part in talks, rallies, colourful protests and many cultural festivities designed to pressure the Federal Government on Indigeneous rights issues. They want the Government to provide a temporary campsite for the supporters, saying "organised chaos was better than disorganised chaos."

The 2006 Stolenwealth Games convergence, described by organisers as the "cultural festival of the 2006 Commonwealth Games," was virtually opened on March 2nd with the launch of the official "Stolenwealth Games" website. Scoop Independent News and Perth Indymedia reported that the launch was held at Federation Square in Melbourne. The site contents were projected via wireless laptop by the Stolenwealth Games General Manager, and a tour of the website was given on the big screen. He said "overwhelming amusement was the response from the audience." The group say permanent access points to the website are being set up at public internet facilities across Victoria during the coming weeks.

Support

"Interest in the Stolenwealth Games is building all over the world and this fresh, exciting and contemporary site will draw in people from Stolenwealth Nations around the globe to find out about the latest news and events," said a Stolenwealth Games spokesperson. "We have been getting many requests from around the world wanting to know about the Stolenwealth Games. We have provided many ways that individuals and organisations can support the campaign by spreading the word."

The Victorian Traditional Owner Land Justice Group (VTOLJG) which represents the first nation groups of Victoria, has announced its support to boycott the 2006 Commonwealth Games until the Government "recognises Traditional Owner rights." The group asserts that culture has been misappropriated in preparation for the Games.

Organisers of the campaign say they welcome the formal support from the Traditional Owners. "While some seek to divide and discredit Indigenous Australia, this support is further evidence that the Aboriginal people are united in opposition to the ongoing criminal genocide that is being perpetrated against the Aboriginal people" said Black GST supporter and Aboriginal Elder, Robbie Thorpe.

"We now have endorsement from the VTOLJG and the Aboriginal Tent Embassy for the aims and objectives of the Campaign and we are looking forward to hosting all indigenous and non-indigenous supporters from across Australia in March," he said. The Black GST group have said "the convergence will be held as a peaceful, family-focussed demonstration against genocide, and for the restoration of sovereignty and the negotiations towards a Treaty."

But the campaign has received flak in mainstream media, such as Melbourne's Herald Sun, who wrote: "the proposal to allow BlackGST to set up an Aboriginal tent embassy at a site well away from the Commonwealth Games will be interpreted by some as the State Government caving in to a radical protest group. A major concern for the Government... is to protect the event from disruption... no chances should be taken..."

"Games Management Zones"

The Black GST has been planning the convergence for months, calling for Aboriginal people and their supporters to converge on Melbourne. The Melbourne-based Indigenous rights group have called on thousands of people concerned about the plight of indigenous Australians to converge on Melbourne during the Games, which they have dubbed "the Stolenwealth Games". But the choice of Kings Domain has made conflict almost inevitable, as the area is one of the areas gazetted by the State Government as a "Games management zone".

Under the Commonwealth Games Arrangements Act, any area gazetted as a management zone is subject to a range of specific laws - including bans on protesting, creating a disturbance and other activities. The protest bans will be in effect at different times and places, and offenders can be arrested. A spokeswoman for the Black GST, which advocates peaceful protest, said the site had been chosen because it was close to where the Queen will stay on March 15. "We figured that she is only in Melbourne for 27 hours or something like that so we thought we would make it easy for her to come next door and see us," she said. "We are a very open, welcoming group, so she will be welcome to come and join us."

Kings Domain is the burial site for 38 indigenous forefathers of Victoria. Black GST elder, Targan, said trade union groups have offered to install infrastructure at the site. The group initially worked with the State Government to find a suitable camp site, but the relationship broke down when the Government failed to meet a deadline imposed by the protesters. "While we are disappointed the ministers were not able to meet deadline on our request, we thank them for their constructive approach towards negotiations and the open-door policy exercised," said Targan.

A spokesman for Games Minister Justin Madden said the Government was still investigating other sites. Victoria Police Games security commander Brendan Bannan said he was not convinced the Black GST represented the views of most indigenous people. "We are dealing with the Aboriginal community and they don't seem to support it at all … the wider Aboriginal community don't support disruption to the Games at all," he said.

The Government was told that Black GST supporters would camp in Fitzroy Gardens and other city parks should it fail to nominate a site. A spokesman for Aboriginal Affairs Minister Gavan Jennings said the Government was taking the issue seriously, but had not been able to finalise a campsite before the deadline.

Aboriginal Tent Embassy - Canberra

Under special Games laws, people protesting or causing a disturbance in "Games management zones" can be arrested and fined. While prominent public spaces such as Federation Square, Birrarung Marr, Albert Park and the Alexandra Gardens fall under the legislation, such tough anti-protest laws cannot be enforced in the nearby Fitzroy Gardens.

Games chairman Ron Walker has urged the group to choose another date for its protest march through the city, which is currently planned to coincide with the opening ceremony on March 15. The group believes that an opportunity to gain attention for indigenous issues was lost at the Sydney Olympics and has vowed to make a highly visible presence at the Games.

Sacred Flames

The Black GST said the Australian Aboriginal Tent Embassy's sacred flame, burning over many years at the Canberra site will be carried to Melbourne before the Games, and its arrival would mark the opening of the protest camp from where a march will proceed to the MCG before the Opening Ceremony.

Black GST claims supporters from all over Australia, including three busloads from the West Australian Land Council, will gather in Melbourne during the Games for peaceful protests.

Aboriginal Affairs Minister Gavin Jennings had offered Victoria Park to the protesters. Victoria Park, former home of Collingwood Football Club, where one of the strongest statements of Aboriginal pride, when St Kilda star Nicky Winmar in 1993 raised his jumper and pointed to his bare chest after racial taunts from the Collingwood crowd.

Black GST, which has labelled the Games the Stolenwealth Games, said the State Government had failed to find a suitable venue. Black GST may encourage protesters to camp in prominent parks such as Fitzroy Gardens and Treasury Gardens. Graffiti supporting the action has also appeared in central Melbourne.

Aerial shot of Commonwealth Games venues, Melbourne - Feb 2006

Melbourne City councillor Fraser Brindley has offered his home to the Black GST organisers. "I offered my home up to people who are organising visitors to come to the Games," he said. Cr Brindley will be overseas when the Commonwealth Games are held and has offered the free accommodation at his flat at Parkville. He said he agreed with the protesters' view that treaties needed to be signed with indigenous Australians. "I'm offering it up to the indigenous people who are coming to remind Her Majesty that her Empire took this land from them," said Cr Brindlley. Nationals leader Peter Ryan said: "This extremist group has no part in the Australian community." Melbourne councillor Peter Clarke said the actions were embarrassing and that he would try to discourage him. "It's not in the spirit of the Games," he said.

Aboriginal elder, Targan, said the possibility of securing Victoria Park was delightfully ironic. "There's a lot of irony going on," Targan, 53, a PhD student at Melbourne University, said. "GST stands for Genocide, Sovereignty and Treaty. We want the genocide of our people to stop; we want some sovereignty over traditional land, certainly how it is used, and we want a treaty with the government," Targan said.

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