ANZACs remembered ninety years after assault on Gallipoli

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Monday, April 25, 2005

An overview of the Gallipoli Peninsula. The dotted lines approximately mark the furthest advance of Allied Forces.


Australians and New Zealanders throughout the world stood still for their national war memorial days in remembrance of the failed Australian and New Zealand Army Corps — ANZAC — attack on Gallipoli, Turkey that began on 25 April 1915. The fateful attack was designed to end the First World War more quickly by creating a supply line to Russia. A hundred-thousand died in the battle, remembered every year as ANZAC Day by both nations.

The British-directed battle of Gallipoli is often seen as the defining moment in the 'birth' of Australia and New Zealand. With New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark saying "For New Zealand as for Australia it was at Gallipoli that our young nations came of age." [1]. This being the 90th anniversary of the attack, Clark, Australian Prime Minister John Howard and Britain's Prince Charles are all at Gallipoli to remember that fateful campaign.

Some controversy has been created about Australian Prime Minister John Howard not attending the New Zealand ceremony at Chunuk Bair on the Gallipoli Peninsula. This has upset many people as it is a break in a tradition that the Prime Ministers attend the ceremonies of both countries.

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