St. Anthony Foundation provides hope

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Friday, September 23, 2005

Logo for St. Anthony's foundation

On the corner of Golden Gate Ave. and Jones St. in the Tenderloin, San Francisco, right next to the Civic Center you can see a throng of low-income and homeless people lining up outside of St. Anthony’s Dining Room hall which opens up it’s doors everyday at 11:30 a.m. Volunteers dressed in St. Anthony Foundation shirts help keep the lines moving as hundreds of homeless and low income people shuffle their way towards the dining hall underneath the watchful eyes of a small statue of St. Francis of Assisi.

"There’s a lot of people who go hungry out here and it ain't right." says Jimmy Scott, a slightly brawny 44-year-old black man who has been living homeless in San Francisco for the past three years. "There are families out here with kids and everything and they have to walk around all night just to stay awake so they don’t get hurt or killed...Right here in the U.S. this is going ain't right."

The dining hall, which has been open for the past 54 years, is owned by the St. Anthony Foundation which helps low income and homeless people and families in the Civic Center, Tenderloin, and SOMA areas with clothing, shelter, food, drug rehabilitation, and many other services. St. Anthony’s administrative offices are found at 121 Golden Gate Ave. with the majority of the foundation’s buildings on Golden Gate Ave. and Jones St.

"We are right in the heart of the homeless population of San Francisco," says Barry Stenger, 55, who's been working for the St. Anthony Foundation for one year, and is the Director of Development and Communications, "and people are pushed here because of the economic forces of San Francisco because it's hard to be upper middle class in San Francisco."

According to the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, "San Francisco’s cost of living remains one of the highest in the country" with the average household income in San Francisco being around $76,400 and the average price of housing being $543,000. Average household income for the United States in 2002, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, was $42,409 and the average price of housing for the United States according to the National Association of Realtors was $185,200 in 2004.

"We served our 32 millionth meal on Tuesday," said Stenger, “and we serve 2,500 meals a day. Some of our people who work here actually get served [food] here because they spend all their money towards rent and medical costs."

The St. Anthony Foundation was started by Fr. Alfred Boeddeker in 1950 one year after Fr. Boeddeker became pastor of St. Boniface church on Golden Gate St. where he was baptized as a child. During his lifetime, according to the foundation’s website, he was referred to as the "Patron St. of the Tenderloin" and had Boeddeker park named after him because of his, and his foundation's, achievements with helping out the homeless and low income community.

"[St. Anthony’s] is a good thing," said Jimmy Scott, "they provide a good service and they feed people and they clothe them and provide furniture when you get housing and give you groceries when you have AIDS. It's a good little organization."

"Our dining room is open 365 days a year." Said Stenger. "Our other facilities are open seven days a week. We have a residence for senior women and our [free medical] clinic is open five days a week and we also have a furniture and clothing store. We have 12 programs all together."

Some of those programs are the Father Alfred Center which provides 61 men two programs for getting out of drug and alcohol abuse, the Employment Program/Learning Center which helps participants in educational and employment opportunities and provides each one with a personal staff advisor, and a Senior Outreach and Support Services center which states its mission is to "promote independence, self determination, and alleviate isolation" for seniors who are 60 and older.

A few homeless people who were interviewed complained that St. Anthony’s had some staff who were rude and that they were kicked out of the dining hall; other homeless within the area refuted those claims saying St. Anthony's has nice staff and only kicks people out who cause trouble.

"It’s a good place and good people. Everybody is so kind and so respectful and everything is under control." Said John Henderson, a tall and skinny 57-year-old homeless black man who has only been living in San Francisco for close to two months because he recently moved there from Phoenix, Arizona. "It’s pretty cool because they’re under control because yesterday I saw at Glide [Memorial Church which also has services for the poor and low income] and they were handing out food boxes and people were just rushing in and the woman in charge there was freaking out and so she just sat down. That would never happen at St. Anthony's."

"And they clean too!" Henderson said laughing with a grin on his face referring to the fact that there are no drugs allowed in the premises. "Not that Glide ain’t clean if you know what I mean."

"We [also] have a whole division that deals with justice education and advocacy to change the system that brings people to our doorstep." Said Stenger. "We hear a lot of appreciation from the people we serve. We get a lot of testimony from our clients who have become clean and sober. Sometimes we have to push them a little to get them out the door because they love the [foundation] so much because it has changed their lives."

This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

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  • Donald R. Andrews, 40, homeless and has lived in San Francisco for 20 years.
  • David Burleigh, 36, homeless and recently released from prison and hospital.
  • William Campbell, 58, homeless.
  • Sarah Chand, works at "Smoke Shop" on Market and Jones St.
  • R.K. Hampton, 49, homeless.
  • Ross Pritchard, 49, homeless and has been living in San Francisco for 18 years.
  • Roland, 45, homeless and was selling body wash at the Civic Center MUNI Station.
  • Jimmy Scott, 44, homeless in San Francisco for 3 years.
  • "Natasha" Scott, 32, homeless transgendered male who is Jimmy Scott’s "wife".
  • Barry Stenger, 55, Director of Development and Communications at St. Anthony’s.
  • Cedric Thomas, homeless and has been living in San Francisco for 4 years.
  • Sara White, 34, homeless in San Francisco for 3 years originally from Florida.