Apple Computer CEO Steve Jobs gives opening keynote to WWDC 2005

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Monday, June 6, 2005

Apple CEO Steve Jobs

Apple Computer CEO and co-founder Steve Jobs gave his annual opening keynote to the World Wide Developers Conference (WWDC) at Moscone Center in San Francisco, California on Monday. He announced a seamless integration of podcasting with iTunes, and, to the amazement of many, that future Apple Macintosh computers will feature Intel processors.

Jobs welcomed everyone to the event and announced that there were 3,800 attendees. There are 500 Apple engineers at what is their largest developers conference in the past decade. There are over 500,000 developers of Apple programs (apps). Jobs said that Apple has 109 retail stores, with one million visitors per week, creating over $500 million yearly in revenue. The Mac market share is up 82% from 9 months ago.

Jobs then moved on to talk about a very anticipated announcement- Podcasting. Steve called podcasting “Wayne’s World for radio”. He called it the “hottest thing going in radio”, and, “exciting”. There are over 8,000 podcasts. Steve Jobs announced that automatic podcasting subscription would be built in to iTunes and iPod seamlessly. He also announced that QuickTime 7 would be soon available for Windows.

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Jobs demoing the Wikipedia Dashboard widget

Moving on, Jobs announced that there have been 2 million copies of Tiger sold in the 6 weeks that it has been available. He demoed the Wikipedia Dashboard widget. Steve announced that Mac OS X Leopard would be released in 2007, the same time as Microsoft’s Longhorn.

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Steve Jobs announcing the switch from PowerPC to Intel processors

In a surprising move, Steve Jobs announced that Macintosh computers would begin to be shipped with Intel processors, the same as in Windows machines, ending the eleven year partnership with IBM and Motorola. This is said to be out of Apple's increasing frustration at IBM's inability to deliver faster and cooler processors, though it is interesting to note that Intel has recently added Digital Rights/Restrictions Management (DRM) to its latest processors. This 'switch', he said, would happen beginning next year. Jobs said that Mac OS X has had “a secret double life” and OS X had “been compiled [for Intel processors] for five years.” He talked about the easiness for developers to port their Mac apps to Intel (x86) processors. Current PowerPC programs can be run on Intel processors due to a new Apple technology. He said that Apple is “getting ready” for the transition from PowerPC to Intel.

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