Talk:Photo source for Barack Obama presidential campaign "HOPE" poster discovered

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Original reporting[edit]

The original reporting for this piece consists of synthesizing the evidence to show that the wrong photograph has been been widely reported as the basis of the Obama posters, as well as some of the image analysis. The detail about AP not giving out the names of photographers comes from my phone call to the Associated Press inquiring about the image. User:Dforest and I both conducted searches on TinEye.com to determine that the actual source photo came from the Associated Press.--ragesoss (talk) 04:15, 21 January 2009 (UTC)

Good work. Has anyone approached stevesimula (or indeed Fairey or Young) for a quote? --InfantGorilla (talk) 14:31, 21 January 2009 (UTC)
Young has been quoted in a couple stories, I think , and Fairey is all over the place. But this morning the photographer Tom Gralish of The Philadephia Inquirere let me know that he tracked down the actual photographer, a DC freelancer named Mannie Garcia. The answer was waiting on the web, I just wasn't clueful enough to find it.--ragesoss (talk) 15:32, 21 January 2009 (UTC)
Cool. As a matter of style, it would have been good to see a couple of quotes. All the same, it is an interesting piece of investigation, and an interesting article. --InfantGorilla (talk) 09:54, 22 January 2009 (UTC)

Sources[edit]

Please use {{source}} for formatting sources. --SVTCobra 00:36, 21 January 2009 (UTC)

Comment[edit]

This article assumes that the reader knows what the Barack Obama "Hope" poster is. I didn't, until I read this. Also, it probably ought to consider the international audience. As it is, it is like a domestic US article. --SVTCobra 00:00, 22 January 2009 (UTC)

Review[edit]


Copyright on face and pose?[edit]

Let's consider these "questions of intellectual property" a bit further. Suppose Barack Obama made an effort to pose in the same position for a new photograph, and the original artist painted a new version based on that photo, using his original color scheme. Suppose this new painting was essentially indistinguishable from the first, or at least, not more different from the AP photo. Would someone question whether that too had to be licensed from the photographer? If so, would that mean that AP held the copyright on Obama's face, at least when it is in a certain thoughtful pose? If not, would that mean that the first of two very similar drawings by an artist can be a copyright violation, while the second is not, based not on what they look like but only based on his assumed thought process? Mike Serfas (talk) 04:07, 24 January 2009 (UTC)